Bat Out of Hell and Available Light: this week’s best UK theatre and dance


Theatre

1 Bat Out of Hell
Romeo and Juliet meets Peter Pan in this dystopian rock musical. Don’t worry about working out the story; there really isn’t one, or at least one that makes much sense. Just revel in the gloriously over-the-top wackiness of it all. Jim Steinman’s rock anthems and Jon Bausor’s designs offer a tongue-in-cheek sense of the ridiculous, as well as a car falling into the orchestra pit.
Coliseum, WC2, to 22 August

2 Wolf’s Child
Bill Mitchell, the founder of Wildworks, a company specialising in creating theatre in which the natural landscape is an integral part of the experience, died earlier this year. He was a theatre visionary and his legacy lives on in this reworked version of a show first seen at the Norfolk & Norwich festival in 2015. This is theatre that encourages you to stray from the path, even when wolves lurk in the wilderness. Their howls hang in the air in this story that follows a wolf mother and her wards.
Trelowarren Estate, Helston, 11-30 July

3 Terror

The audience become jury in Ferdinand von Schirach’s play, a kind of interactive version of 12 Angry Men crossed with the Moral Maze. Lars Koch, a fighter pilot, is on trial for murder. Disobeying orders, he shot down a plane that had been hijacked by terrorists resulting in 164 deaths. But in doing so, he probably saved the lives of 70,000 people in a football stadium – the hijackers’ real target. The production can’t overcome the static, wordy nature of the proceedings, but it does make you constantly question your own moral positions.
Lyric Hammersmith, W6, to 15 July

4 Yank! A WWII Love Story
“The show that Rodgers and Hammerstein never wrote” is how Joseph and David Zellnik’s 2010 off-Broadway hit, inspired by true stories of gay American soldiers who fought in the second world war, has been described. These hidden histories come wrapped in unashamedly 1940s musical style as Stu and Mitch meet in the barrack room and fall for each other, but find themselves separated by war, homophobia and their own fear of being outed.
Charing Cross theatre, WC2, to 19 August

5 The Ferryman
Ten years ago, Quinn’s brother went missing. Now he’s been found and the past is haunting the present in a Northern Ireland farmyard kitchen in the early 1980s. Jez Butterworth’s play takes its title from Greek myth and nods towards both Brian Friel and Frank McGuinness but it’s a distinctively meaty and textured piece on its own terms.
Gielgud theatre, W1, to 6 January

Dance



Mesmerising … Available Light. Photograph: Craig T Mathew

1 Dorrance Dance
Choreographer Michelle Dorrance and her dancers bring a sharp, contemporary mix of street and club to the traditions of tap in ETM: Double Down.
Sadler’s Wells, EC1, 12-15 July

2 10000 Gestures
Clever French conceptualist Boris Charmatz tests the limits of how we see and interpret dance material in a work that is literally composed of 10,000 different gestures.
Mayfield, Manchester, 13-15 July

3 Available Light
Lucinda Childs’s poetic classic of minimalist dance is set to John Adams’s mesmerising score Light Over Water and framed by the architectural designs of Frank Gehry.
Palace Theatre, Manchester, 8 July



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